Jack Frost (1934) Ub Iwerks (Music by Carl Stalling)



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Christmas Cartoon: Jack Frost (1934) ComiColor Ub Iwerks
Musical Score by Carl Stalling: http://bit.ly/CarlStallingMusic

JACK FROST (1934) Christmas Seasonal Cartoon.
Directed and produced by Ub Iwerks, who became Walt Disney’s foremost animator/collaborator in the formative early years. Animated by Al Eugster.

Jack Frost paints the leaves orange and brown as he warns the animals of the forest that Old Man Winter is coming. A bear cub mocks the idea, via song. He’s a grizzly bear, he declares; and he’s got a nice, warm coat. Later, his mother tucks him into bed, but he tries to sneak away. She spanks him and puts him back to bed. Tearfully, he runs away from home. He enjoys seeing the jack o’ lanterns come to life, and listening to the scarecrow scat sing. But suddenly Old Man Winter arrives, and the poor bear cub is freezing. He’ll need Jack Frost’s help, in this animated musical short.

JACK FROST Christmas cartoon appears on “Cartoons That Time Forgot” Ub Iwerks Collection at: http://bit.ly/UbToons
Pioneering solo cartoon work of Ub Iwerks, Walt Disney’s foremost animator/collaborator in the formative early years. The first fully animated color cartoon version of “Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp” (1934)…the legendary Flip the Frog in the slapstick masterpiece “The New Car” (1931)…the original cartoon adaptation of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” “The Headless Horseman” (1934)…the little-known animation star Willie Whopper in the surrealistic sci-fi classic “Stratos Fear” (1933)…and a famous “lost” film, a full-color cartoonization of “Don Quixote” (1934). These are just a few of the 58 cartoons captured on these two DVDs (available separately) of rediscovered masterworks from the very beginnings of the Golden Age of American Animation at: http://bit.ly/UbToons

Ub Iwerks (March 24, 1901 – July 7, 1971) was a two-time Academy Award winning American animator, cartoonist and special effects technician, who was famous for his work for Walt Disney. He was born Ubbe Ert Iwwerks in Kansas City, Missouri.

Iwerks was considered by many to be Walt Disney’s oldest friend, and spent most of his career with Disney. The two met in 1919 while working for the Pesman Art Studio in Kansas City, and would eventually start their own commercial art business together. Disney and Iwerks then found work as illustrators for the Kansas City Slide Newspaper Company. While working for the Kansas City Film Ad Company, Disney decided to take up work in animation, and Iwerks soon joined him.

He was responsible for the distinctive style of the earliest Disney animated cartoons, and was also responsible for creating Mickey Mouse. In 1922, when Walt began his Laugh-O-Gram cartoon series, Iwerks joined him as chief animator. The studio went bankrupt, however, and in 1923 Iwerks followed Disney’s move to Los Angeles to work on a new series of cartoons known as the Alice Comedies. After the end of this series, Disney asked Iwerks to come up with a new character. The first Oswald the Lucky Rabbit was animated entirely by Ub Iwerks. Following the first cartoon, Oswald was redesigned on the insistence of Universal, who agreed to distribute the new series of cartoons in 1927.

Carl W. Stalling (November 10, 1891 – November 29, 1972) was an American composer and arranger for animated films. He is most closely associated with the Looney Tunes shorts produced by Warner Bros., where he worked, averaging one complete score each week.

Stalling was consistently an innovator. He was the first music director to extensively use the metronome to time film scores. He was one of three composers, along with Max Steiner and Scott Bradley, credited with the invention of the click track. His stock-in-trade was the “musical pun”, where he used references to popular songs, or even classical pieces, to add a dimension of humor to the action on the screen. Working with legendary directors Tex Avery, Bob Clampett, Friz Freleng, Robert McKimson, and Chuck Jones, he developed the “Looney Tunes” style of very rapid and tightly coordinated musical cues, punctuated with both instrumental and recorded sound effects, and occasionally reaching into full blown musical fantasies such as The Rabbit of Seville and A Corny Concerto.

Christmas Cartoons and Christmas Movies from XmasFLIX.com
A festive collection of classic Christmas cartoons, holiday TV shows
and vintage Christmas movies from: http://XmasFLIX.com

Christmas Cartoon: Jack Frost (1934) ComiColor Ub Iwerks
Musical Score by Carl Stalling: http://bit.ly/CarlStallingMusic


Post time: 09-25-2017